Tuesday, March 4, 2014

Names #460-466

GIRLS


Kealohilani - Hawaiian, the name of a heavenly land, from 'ke' meaning 'the', 'alohi' meaning 'brightness', and 'lani' meaning 'sky' or 'heaven.


Lianet - I have not yet found anything on an etymology or origin for this name. Perhaps it is a variant spelling of the name Lynette, which comes from the Welsh root 'llyn' and means 'lake'.









Mamediarra- this seems to be a name used to honor a Murid saint from Senegal, Mame Diarra Bousso. She was the mother of the man who founded the Murid tradition, which is a Sufi branch of Islam. Her given name was Sohkna Maryama. This part of Africa is inhabited by various clans that speak Mandinka. French is also spoken in the area and so I believe this would make Mame mean either 'mother' or be used as a courtesy title or religious prefix. Diara is the name of one of the clans. It appears to mean 'neighbor'. To just use Diarra would honor the clan name, but to use Mamediarra honors the holy woman.





One of Russia's greatest victors, the first man in space
BOYS
 


Nikita - Russian form of the Greek name Niketas, which is derived from Nike, the goddess of victory and thus, means 'victor' or one who has been awarded victory.


Turkish hordes sacking a Roman villa


Odoacer - possibly Turkish, from Ot-toghar meaning "grass-born" or "fire-born" or from Otghar meaning "herder". Also possibly Germanic, from Audawakrs, which comes from 'aud' meaning 'wealth' and 'wakrs' meaning 'vigilant'


Odoacer, King of Italy
Powhatan - Algonquian, from 'powa' meaning 'medicine man' and 'atan' meaning 'hill' or 'mountain'. Powhatan is both the name of Pocahontas' father, the chief and leader of their people, and the name of that tribe of Algonquian Indians, as well as the name of their language. Powhatan is the name the English used for Pocahontas' father, however, his name was actually Wahunsunacawh, which seems to me a name that would have been hard to pronounce and remember and Powhatan was much simpler for the English.








Rutherford - English, from 'ruther' meaning cattle and 'ford' meaning 'river crossing'.

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